Tag Archives: udev

Xorg and HAL (2)

As already mentioned in “Xorg and HAL” X-land is in state of “complete” redesign.

Today I read at Phoronix that Intel released their driver update 2.11.0. Curious as I tend to be I had to compile Xorg, Mesa and the driver once again to take a look at what’s going on myself.

Because support for setting properties via udev seems to have gone in favour of the shiny new “conf.d” features, my old post is definitely outdated.

Not that big of a deal though, to configure your touchpad/-stick you now have to create InputClass-Sections in *.conf-files in “/etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/” (99-trackstick.conf in this example).

Section "InputClass"
	Identifier			"dualpointstick"
	MatchProduct			"DualPoint Stick"

	Option "ButtonMapping"		"3 2 1 4 5"
	Option "EmulateWheel"		"true"
	Option "EmulateWheelButton"	"2"
	Option "EmulateWheelTimeout"	"400"
	Option "YAxisMapping"		"4 5"
EndSection

By the way: Subsequent rules seem to be overwritten, so copying “/usr/lib/X11/xorg.conf.d/05-evdev.conf” makes sure “normal” input devices use the evdev driver.

Ah, in case you might have wondered: Yes, contrary to mice I use touchpads and tracksticks with my left hand. Which other OS would allow me to configure input devices like that?

Xorg and HAL

A few things have been brewing in Linux-world concerning the replacement of HAL for some time now: Ubuntu’s Lucid Lynx (10.04) for example will ship without it.

Xorg 1.7.4 was uploaded to Debian/unstable three days ago and comes with udev support, which also means that support for configuration of input devices via HAL was dropped (at least for Linux).

So, in case you might wonder how to configure your input devices, here’s an example for my Synaptics touchpad. Similar to HAL, put your .fdi-files into “/etc/udev/rules.d/”.

ACTION!="add|change", GOTO="xorg_synaptics_end"
KERNEL!="event*", GOTO="xorg_synaptics_end"
ENV{ID_INPUT_TOUCHPAD}!="1", GOTO="xorg_synaptics_end"

ENV{x11_options.MinSpeed}="0.50"
ENV{x11_options.MaxSpeed}="1.3"
ENV{x11_options.AccelFactor}="0.025"

LABEL="xorg_synaptics_end"

Although you can get rid of HAL completely, some (Gnome-) packages are still built with HAL support and dependencies. I for example had to rebuild gnome-power-manager and sound-juicer but after that I was able to disable HALs start-script. Another problem you might face is the dependency of bluez (the bluetooth implementation) on HAL.

If you’re interested: Xorg developer about udev-directions